Did secret service know more than claimed in Lübcke murder case?

0

The Hessian Office for the Protection of the Constitution might have known more about Lübcke’s alleged murderer than was initially admitted. A secret paper incriminates the authority.

Growing evidence is surfacing that the Hessian Office for the Protection of the Constitution had far more information on the alleged murderer of Walter Lübcke than it had initially stated. Already last week, doubts had arisen about the statements of the state agency, after it became known how meticulously the murder of the Kassel district’s chief administrator had been planned by Stephan E. and his accomplice Markus H..

Now the Office for the Protection of the Constitution had to admit that Stephan E. was mentioned eleven times in a secret report from 2014. Thus, the original statement of the authority that he had only been in focus until 2009, after which he was no longer noticed, is apparently not correct.

The trigger for this new development was a complaint by the newspaper “Die Welt”, which had insisted in court to obtain information from the State Office for the Protection of the Constitution. The administrative court in Wiesbaden finally granted the complaint. The document, in which Stephan E. was mentioned eleven times, is of particular interest because it is related to the parliamentary investigative committee that deals with the investigations into the NSU terrorist group, and was supposed to remain classified for 120 years.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here